PwC recruiters ‘deeply impressed’ by CV’s Bronze D of E award

PwC needs compass skills

With applications for their graduate scheme streaming in, partners at consulting giant PricewaterhouseCoopers this afternoon reached out to The Whip with words of advice for applicants.

Chairman of the Big Four firm Robert Moritz explained that the corporation wanted to clarify what really matters to its recruiters, and what prospective employees can do to impress them and bag position at the corporation.

‘Despite being a multinational conglomerate with offices in over 30 countries worldwide, PwC is flattered once again by the sheer number of applications for our 2018 graduate scheme’ began the statement.

‘Indeed, according to current estimates, 85% of third years at the University of Bristol, UK, have signed up to our online registration program.

‘However, due to said popularity, we have had to screen candidates more rigorously than ever before. It goes without saying that knowledge of consulting practices, a Masters degree in a quantitative field like mathematics or finance, and a passion for our ever-growing client base of globally recognised brands, are all prerequisites for successful applicants.

‘However, what really stands out in the view of the board and our partners is previous experience in Key Stage 4 extra-curricula outdoors adventure programs. In particular, the Bronze Duke of Edinburgh Award.

‘One CV which deeply impressed us included the highly prestigious Duke of Edinburgh award. The candidate really distinguished herself with this, showing she had not only physical toughness, walking 20km over just two days, but also the mental savvy to not thereafter complete the obsolete silver and gold qualifications.

‘Everyone knows those secondary awards are for neeky weirdo types who like soggy walks in the Brecon Beacons for some unholy reason.’

The representative also wanted to encourage other candidates to think of other things to set them apart from the crowd.

‘School sports teams, particularly 3rd team hockey, and As in GCSE double award science are always things we look for.’