Entire open mic impressed by student’s moving reprisal of Harlem Shake

The audience of Stoke Croft’s Arts House Café were stunned yesterday evening after a University of Bristol third year student performed a heartfelt and moving reprisal of archaic viral trend ‘The Harlem Shake’.

The dance, first made popular in 2013, was reborn through a thoughtful rendition that The Guardian’s culture editor Simon Short declared ‘asked more questions about the nature of our society than it could possibly answer’.

Using the original musical score, Michael Jameson, 21, moved towards the piece’s climax with increasingly vigorous crotch movement and tentative clenching of fists, delighting open mic veterans searching for meaning in his creative demonstration.

The Whip caught up with Mr. Jameson after the deafening applause subsided:  

“Through my reconstruction, those watching are given the opportunity to consider internal conceptions of the self, identity in the modern world, and what it looks like if someone suddenly starts gyrating in a bike helmet” the undergraduate explained.

Like every true artist however, Michael was not entirely happy with his performance. “It wasn’t perfect” he admitted. “Initially I wanted to incorporate a neck nomination into the latter stages of my work, but the essential nature of the motorcycle wear means I can’t also shove raw food into my mouth.” He continued “Maybe next time I’ll find a way to combine these two symbolic actions to truly capture the zeitgeist of yesteryear.”

Despite the critical self-assessment, the nostalgic rendition seemed to have the creator’s intended effect, as onlookers remained transfixed for an entire thirty minutes. The audience were then given the chance to discuss the choreography in a post-performance Q&A, with one fascinated onlooker commenting ‘I sort of remember that from ages ago yeh’ whilst an in-house reviewer remarked ‘you almost hit that light bulb on the left at the beginning, don’t know if you realised’.

As proceedings drew to a close, Michael quipped “A fleeting internet trend will come and go. But my performance will be etched onto the minds of those here tonight for years to come. That’s why I get up and share my ideas week in, week out.”

The performance will shortly be available to download from the Itunes store.