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Bristol UK

Careers Service unimpressed by Liberal Arts student’s ambition to become liberal artist

The system is broken.

The University of Bristol’s Careers Service was thrown into disarray this week following a bizarre request made at a Wednesday morning appointment. Gabe Chan, a final year Liberal Arts student, sought something hitherto unknown to the career service and indeed the wider world: a career as a liberal artist.

Confusion spread through the office immediately, as Chief Career Advisor Ronald McDonald tells our correspondent:

“I think just the sheer exoticism of the question stumped our staff. We did our best to find potential careers for the boy in some local Lib Dem offices, placements in the Tate modern, even as a member of the new Independent Group, but he insisted the two terms corresponded to an entirely different career path altogether…”

However, confusion soon gave way to total pandemonium, as intern and coffee assistant Ernest explained:

“It was terrifying; we couldn’t for the life of us determine what a liberal artist actually did” explained the graduate as he flicked on the kettle. “We’re usually really good at shoehorning arts students with abstract employment desires into promising careers. Just last week for example, we managed to find a student a placement in Tokyo researching postmodern feminism’s impact on the rate of photosynthesis in Japanese Hydrangeas. This time, we had no choice but to accept defeat.”

Despite the resultant chaos in the Careers Service, the undergraduate still feels his inquiry was a valid one:

“I don’t get it. Engineering students become Engineers, Medicine students become Medics, it’s about time us Liberal Art students got a chance to turn our passion into something meaningful! For too long we’ve been squeezed into boxes that society carves out for us, and now it’s time for us to burst free to make our own, unique mark on the world, whatever everyone may think!”

It has since been revealed that Mr Chan has secured a summer graduate placement with PwC.

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